I’m going to barter for things. AMY GOODMAN: —risking their lives and, as you said, dying. But in the hospital, I was extremely religious. (33 minutes) 25 Longest Home Runs of the Decade (2010-2017) - Duration: 14:48. I mean, there are so many things that are just beyond imaginable. AMY GOODMAN: Meaning the high and then the low. And that was like, I just started acting really weird. Jamie Lee Curtis discusses her extraordinary career with Vanity Fair, from 'Halloween,' 'Trading Places,' and 'My Girl' to 'Freaky Friday' and 'Knives Out. But, you know, I say that I’m really lucky, because I can do that. No manic person—in the throes of omnipotence, ecstasy, and strategic warfare—wants to hear that they are…just sick,” Lowe writes. NERMEEN SHAIKH: Well, one of the things that you say, in terms of the extent to which lithium is prescribed, is that it’s not a patented drug. I was basically like, “I’m fine. Can you talk about what it means for girls, for boys, for women, for men? Everybody sort of has their own—you know, as the symptoms are very similar, but each person really—it’s the hardest thing to treat, because it’s just your own experience is slightly different from the person next to you, which is why it’s really hard to tackle as a national issue. You’re a professional journalist. In 255 pages she seeks to unravel the soul of … I mean, I think that the high leads to poor decision-making. For Heeb‘s Music Issue, I was issued the task of reporting on a lawsuit that Ol’ Dirty Bastard’s former manager, Jarred Weisfeld, had filed against the rapper’s biographer, Jaime Lowe. Some of her memories are gut wrenching and awful, some are a hallucinogenic dream. I think that it’s a factor of both environment and genetics. Now, there’s a lot of debate within the psychiatric community about to what extent this disorder, which used to be known as manic depression, is caused by a chemical imbalance and what’s caused by environmental factors. So—. Lithium was kind of in my back pocket and worked. JAIME LOWE: So, that was—that’s a really good question. NERMEEN SHAIKH: Well, one of the strange things, which you also point out, is that there’s still—despite this massive prevalence of mental illness, there’s still a kind of social stigma that’s attached to it. Jaime Lowe She was on lithium for two decades but was forced to go off it when she experienced serious kidney problems as a result of the medication. I mean, since you were working with a doctor, you knew you were tapering down. I thought because I didn't talk about the assault or even think about it much, everything was as resolved as it could be. And I did the last interview with him for The Village Voice before he passed away, and ended up feeling like that book was actually equally about mental illness as this book, but—. Please do your part today. Why do you think that is? And it was like I wanted to just roll around in it and kind of pay homage to this thing that had helped me for so long. NERMEEN SHAIKH: Before we go to your trip to Bolivia, which is where most—half of the world’s lithium is found, I wanted to talk about the fact that, in your book, you raise the question of the two different traumas that you experienced that, what you say, triggered your bipolar disorder. I think it was—there’s a stigma to it, and it was shifted to something else. I don’t want to have to.” And I think that that is like a totally natural reaction that everyone who suffers from mental illness sort of has to deal with. The other photo editors also joined in the effort. And I think that the thing with alcoholism and drug abuse is that you are essentially instigating and being out of control and being a different person than who you preternaturally are without those substances. I mean, if someone has cancer or any other kind of physical illness, people don’t, you know, have a difficult time accepting it. Then, I was sort of out of the really good medications for mania. She was a child. We had you on Democracy Now! She is a frequent contributor to The New York Times Magazine.Lowe is the author of Digging for Dirt: The Life and Death of ODB and Mental: Lithium, Love, and Losing My Mind.. Jaime Lowe’s 8 Rules For Writing Memoirs But it’s a similar situation, where you’re kind of—you’ve lost control, and you’re not necessarily who you are when you are functioning and waking up and who you would be at your best day. So, there are studies that have said that it’s good for Parkinson’s, it’s good for ALS, that it’s good in a lot of different ways for brain function, besides just treating bipolar disorder. And you guys are all crazy.”. Getty Images offers exclusive rights-ready and premium royalty-free analog, HD, and 4K video of the highest quality. And so, I’ve paid, I think, more than $100,000, over the time that I’ve been seeing him, just to see him. I have like a million parents. And I think that—you know, I think it’s a really similar situation to alcohol and narcotic dependency. Of course, it means for lithium and all other drugs. This really isn’t like a”—. And, you know, it’s well worth it. Jaime Lowe is an American writer. You know, two men died this year who were inmate firefighters. JAIME LOWE: So, I still experience the highs and lows in life, in a pretty hyperbolic form, even with lithium. Jaime, it’s great to have you with us and to continue this conversation. Archives. JAIME LOWE: It’s a really good question, because it is controversial and totally unknowable, in some ways. Sign up for our Daily News Digest today! Every year some 44 million Americans experience mental illness, of which almost 6 million are diagnosed as bipolar. And I get a lot of letters from people who have read the book or who read the article I wrote for the Times Magazine. AMY GOODMAN: I mean, so many people describe wanting to experience the highs and lows of life, which is why they go off of it. The rest of the medications are more for depression, and I suffer more from mania. From Charlottesville to the Capitol: Trump Fueled Right-Wing Violence. I was freelancing. They told me was I was manic depressive, which was what it was called in—when I was diagnosed, in '93. And that was the bad part. AMY GOODMAN: You describe in your book about the importance of your family, like you dedicate this to all your parents. We rely on contributions from our viewers and listeners to do our work. And like, you know, I was very—I would talk to anyone who—like, I would say anyone who would talk to me, but it was actually I would just talk to anyone, like whether they wanted me to approach them or not. AMY GOODMAN: And then, we met you not through anything to do with this. She lives in Brooklyn, New York. AMY GOODMAN: And explain what lithium is, and explain how—what effect it had on you and why you eventually, after decades, had to give it up. Jaime Lowe’s episode came when she was still a girl, something she sees as a benefit. NERMEEN SHAIKH: And do you—from the people that you heard from, all the people you received letters from, after you wrote that New York Times piece, and, no doubt, after this book, as well, did many people say that those around them, those close to them, had responded in this way—in other words, thinking that they had a choice and they just had to get it together, or however people understand it? Do … In terms of—I’m forgetting—. And you don’t have the other side of it. I’m Amy Goodman, with Nermeen Shaikh. Our guest is Jaime Lowe, author of Mental: Lithium, Love, and Losing My Mind. And I was in my senior year, and I kind of just let go of everything else and was like, “OK, this is what’s going to work for me, and this is what I have to do. NERMEEN SHAIKH: Well, while you were in the psychiatric ward, you were kept for a period of time in isolation. Our Daily Digest brings Democracy Now! We speak with journalist and author Jaime Lowe about her remarkable memoir, “Mental: Lithium, Love, and Losing My Mind.” She shares and investigates her experience with mental illness and the drugs used to combat it. With a knack for listening and passion for both people and politics, Opelika’s Jamie Lowe may remind you of Barack Obama – if the former president had a southern twang.. It’s a comparison the humbly confident Lowe may not accept, but he has built a pretty impressive political resume for himself. There is a real spike in adolescent suicide, without even talking about suicide attempts. It was called manic depression. I got off of it because I just couldn’t deal with it. December 2, 2008. For me, it does. So, I then ended up in L.A. for three months with my family and then came back here and was like pretty depressed for six months. JAIME LOWE: I don’t know why it was changed, because it doesn’t—I think “manic depression” actually captures what I go through perfectly. I think like when somebody loses their mind and loses who they are and can’t function the way that you know them to function on a daily basis, it’s really hard to understand that that’s not who they are. JAIME LOWE: I think that that was my breaking point. I mean, I think that that makes it so that psychiatric care is socialized in a way that you have people who have enough money that can actually afford to pay for—I mean, my psychiatrist is not on my health insurance. In her remarkable memoir, titled Mental: Lithium, Love, and Losing My Mind, Jaime Lowe shares and investigates her experience with mental illness and the drugs used to combat it. AMY GOODMAN: I don’t think you described that point where you tapered off and what it meant in terms of what happened to you. But they all had sort of seen this pattern of disarray, mental disarray, I guess. Fine Artist of NYC battled Ewing Sarcoma Copy may not be in its final form. delivered to your inbox every day? AMY GOODMAN: Jaime, can you talk about what you write at the end of your book, which is, “I am lucky. READ MY LATEST BLOG POST - A NEAR MISS. A lot of people feel side effects. Each week Masters publishes a new interview with a success story sure to inspire. AMY GOODMAN: —and for writing this book, Mental: Lithium, Love, and Losing My Mind. And this is what, going forward, I’m going to have to take.” That year was really hard, just because I was kind of—you know, gave up on high school and friends and everything. So, I mean, I—no, I didn’t want to know that I was in a manic phase. Mental: Lithium, Love, and Losing My Mind. AMY GOODMAN: What was—what did it mean to you that your illness was named? We do not accept funding from advertising, underwriting or government agencies. Special on Flint, 2020 Ballot Initiative Wins: Abortion Rights, Lawyers for People Facing Eviction & Payday Loan Limits, Bryan Stevenson Wins “Alternative Nobel”: We Must Overturn This Horrific Era of Mass Incarceration, New Malcolm X Biography Offers Insight into His Split with Nation of Islam & Assassination, Native American Analyst: Our Voting Bloc Helped Flip Wisconsin Blue After It Voted for Trump in 2016. It May Soon Get Even Worse, Would You Patent the Sun? And I think that the—so, I think the sexual assault actually is part of it. I think everyone is—temporarily or not—a little mentally ill.” That’s what our next guest is told by a leading psychiatrist, whom she meets in Rome, in a quest that takes her from a psychiatric ward in Los Angeles to Italy and Bolivia, as she tries to come to grips with the effects of lithium, the drug she’s prescribed when she’s diagnosed at the age of 16 with bipolar disorder. And it’s been used for millennia. Jaime Lowe is a writer for the New York Times Magazine and the author of Mental, a memoir about bipolar disorder. NERMEEN SHAIKH: According to the American Psychiatric Association, bipolar disorders are, quote, “brain disorders that cause changes in a person’s mood, energy and ability to function.” Bipolar disorder used to be called manic depression. It’s out there. And how do you think people should be thinking about mental illness? And similarly, it’s often very difficult for people to accept that they need medication for mental illness. JAIME LOWE: Yeah. We continue our interview with journalist and author Jaime Lowe about her remarkable memoir, Mental: Lithium, Love, and Losing My Mind. This is viewer supported news. So, the tapering off was in 2001. And it just triggered this really, really intense—it was probably a good six months where I was back and forth between New York and L.A., because I wouldn’t stay in L.A., where my parents were trying to like help me get better. I thought an apocalypse was happening. But that story came about mostly because I was fascinated by that program and by the fact that it existed, because I grew up in California and just had no idea that that was 40 percent of our firefighting brigade, is from inmate firefighters. Victor Goldfeld: The _Heeb_ Interview. I’m going to just like buy brussels sprouts and, like, squash.” And like, I was sending like $700 of squash to neighbors. It's now called bipolar disorder. So how do you want those family members to respond to you? But I think like each time something happens, there’s like a little bit—a part of you kind of shifts with it. JAIME LOWE: I think there’s still a stigma because it’s thought of as a type of weakness, that you can’t control yourself, that you can’t control your environment, that you can’t control the world around you, because you’re reacting in a way that is outside of your norm. And it was like horrifying and just like this thing that made everything a billion times worse. AMY GOODMAN: “Hungry Ghost” by Alynda Segarra of Hurray for the Riff Raff, performing here in our Democracy Now! AMY GOODMAN: Before we go, we wanted to talk about Bolivia just for a moment. Business coach, speaker, and author Jaime Masters, is the host of the Eventual Millionaire podcast. I was a real—you know, you’re really like—you don’t want to talk to—you don’t want to hear any rules. Stay with us. AMY GOODMAN: I mean, this amazing story of prisoners, side by side with professional firefighters, so they had been trained—, AMY GOODMAN: —who are fighting the fires and being paid almost nothing—. Everything that’s happening is the way it should be. Well, to be honest, I wish I had come up with the premise behind Theron Humphrey’s This Wild Idea. Lowe is the author of Digging for Dirt: The Life and Death of ODB, a biography of Ol’ Dirty Bastard, a founding member of the Wu-Tang Clan. JAIME LOWE: I think that, you know, identifying male figures in my life, like my dad, and saying that he had abused me, and that that abuse actually was coming from somewhere else. But they have no way of bridging the gap between when they’re released and actually working for CAL FIRE, like there’s no job afterwards. Or maybe it’s much more subtle, and you’d never know. I remember the deli. And that was when I wanted to sort of know him more. And that took 30 percent of federal funding away from mental illness care. And I think that’s why a lot of times they’re kind of like woven in together, where you’re trying to self-medicate with either, you know, drugs or booze or whatever. I didn’t really know much about it in its place in the world. Interview by Jaime Lowe Jan. 16, 2019 Last month, Congress passed the First Step Act, a prison-reform bill intended to reduce recidivism. because you wrote this piece for The New York Times, “The Incarcerated Women Who Fight California’s Wildfires.”. According to the American Psychiatric Association, bipolar disorders are, quote, “brain disorders that cause changes in a person’s mood, energy and ability to function.” Bipolar disorder used to be called manic depression. Explain why. It feels like you’re in a completely different universe, where everything is kind of this crystalline green and you can kind of feel the salt crawling up your body and sort of immersing itself in your pores. AMY GOODMAN: Digging for Dirt: The Life and Death of ODB. What does this mean? AMY GOODMAN: But you know how you want people to respond to you. This is viewer supported news. Jamie Lowe Jamie Lowe Jamie Lowe Jamie Lowe. And some of it was very—you know, some parts of mental illness are kind of funny. JAIME LOWE: And a lot of that is because that—those are GPs doing that. People aren’t—like, psychiatrists don’t prescribe it as much, because it’s not as marketed by pharmaceutical companies. JAIME LOWE: I think I’m lucky in more ways than I can probably articulate, because I’m lucky in terms of my family, in that I have so much family that’s always been so supportive and kind of there to pick up the pieces. Polio Vaccine Inventor Jonas Salk’s Son Urges More Access to, Constitutional Lawyer: Trump Is a Clear & Present Danger, a Senate Impeachment Trial Is Needed Now, Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor: Impeachment Is Late Attempt to Curb Violence & Racism at Heart of Trump Era. studio. Nobody really still knows how it works. This is the way that my life played out. I really am not functioning the way that I should be. So, I did it. It May Soon Get Even Worse, Would You Patent the Sun? JAIME LOWE: So, I—that was what basically brought on this book, is that I had realized that I had this almost love affair with lithium, like this relationship with lithium, that it really helped me function for two decades in a way that I never would have had, and that the minute that I had this physical like reminder that it wasn’t actually 100 percent good for me or that it was, you know, eating away at my kidneys—which is not a technical term—that I had to know more about it. But there were these like small parts of it that didn’t work, and among them was like people dying. I still get really anxious when, you know, there’s too much work on my plate. In Part 1 of our discussion, you talked all about, well, being in a psychiatric ward at UCLA at the age of 16. Lowe is the author of Digging for Dirt: The Life and Death of ODB, a biography of Ol' Dirty Bastard, a founding member of the Wu-Tang Clan. She points to statistics published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that show the use of prescription medication for antidepressants among all ages increased nearly 400 percent over the last two decades. So, it was present in the Big Bang. Your parents are divorced, so you say you’ve got, you know, many, many parents. And then I had—it worked so well, actually, that I—with my psychiatrist, once I had moved to New York after college, we decided that I could like taper down, try life without lithium, because—, JAIME LOWE: That was—I was 25, so it was about—. View Jaime Lowe’s profile on LinkedIn, the world’s largest professional community. You know, that was one of the few things in the book where I was trying to really find a reason for that, because the symptoms are so bizarre. It’s the same, like I don’t have an alternative to gauge it by. That’s—I work so that I can pay him. I thought people could figure that out. But lithium is—the problem is, is that there aren’t more tests done on lithium for other applications, because there isn’t a market for it. So, my psychiatrist and I decided that I would try Depakote again. I think that my family definitely has a history of mental illness. She points to statistics published by the CDC, the Centers for Disease Control, that show the use of prescription medication for antidepressants among all ages increased nearly 400 percent over the last two decades. We speak with journalist and author Jaime Lowe about her remarkable memoir, “Mental: Lithium, Love, and Losing My Mind.” She shares and investigates her … The Caitlin Lowe Interview - Duration: 9:26. Let’s start now by talking about the use of prescription medication for antidepressants among all ages increasing nearly 400 percent—over what period of time? Don't worry, we'll never share or sell your information. AMY GOODMAN: —where half of lithium is found in? Like there’s no money to be made. She is a frequent contributor to The New York Times Magazine and her work has appeared in New York magazine, Esquire, Sports Illustrated, Maxim, Gawker, The Village Voice, LA Weekly, and on ESPN.com. NERMEEN SHAIKH: And what was your experience there? The following year, in ’81, Reagan repealed the act. And I think that’s kind of the bottom line for all of these things, you know. So, I was on Depakote. Like I—. “I was unformed,” she says, adding “I was less formed.” She didn’t have a choice about taking lithium in the same way McDermott at first felt he did. And I think that a lot of—you know, there was this comprehensive study of research from the past 40 years that basically said that sexual assault victims are associated with mental illness. A riveting memoir and a fascinating investigation of the history, uses, and controversies behind lithium, an essential medication for millions of people struggling with bipolar disorder. You talked about traveling to the Bolivian salt mines, where half of the world’s lithium is found. AMY GOODMAN: Can you think of a moment where someone intervened, when you were pushing them away, that made an enormous difference in your life? Years ago, I couldn’t say the word Lithium aloud. Now, it doesn’t necessarily mean it triggers it or that it causes it, but that there is this link between the two things. So, the beginning of it, I was very resistant to medications. It was about Ol’ Dirty Bastard from the Wu-Tang Clan, and he was diagnosed schizophrenic. Lowe notes mental illness is still associated with social stigma despite affecting tens of millions of Americans. I didn’t know anything about it as a medication. NERMEEN SHAIKH: In what sense, though? You accused your father of being abusive, and you said that, in fact, he wasn’t abusive. Sign up for our Daily News Digest today! I’m like in the 1 percent of, you know, the mentally ill, because so many people cannot afford to do that and could never even entertain that concept. I am what I am, like Popeye. You have general practitioners who are writing psychiatric—you know, prescriptions for psychiatric care. And then you embark on this journey, writing Mental: Lithium, Love, and Losing My Mind. I think you have to basically try, and just keep trying and keep trying, to keep that person well and there and close. From Charlottesville to the Capitol: Trump Fueled Right-Wing Violence. Jaime Lowe Jaime Lowe begins CPT. I don’t think everyone has—I know everyone doesn’t have that. And they kind of just put me in this box. So, the lithium, for me, when I took it, I didn’t actually feel that many side effects. I don’t know. Just over four years ago, the mad Wu-Tang affiliated rapper Ol’ … But when I’m not on the medication, the highs and lows are unmanageable. It leads to, you know, any number of kind of—I sent about 1,000 emails to colleagues about story ideas that were like, you know, beyond recognizable, and I would—like, writing poetry and like singing musicals that I had written in 10 minutes that I thought were amazing. The goal of Jaime Lowe’s Digging for Dirt therefore strikes me as an admirable, if unsuccessful, one. My family is completely not—they’re very Reform, and we’re not on that trip. And that was a glimpse of that; I don’t think that I was like completely better and it was an “aha” moment, I was like “OK, great!” But I felt calmer. And actually, it was earlier than that, and the manic episode that followed was that winter. And, you know, I had accused my dad of being physically abusive. And the psychiatrist with the MD being able to prescribe—. So, can you talk about the journey you took to the place, the land of lithium—. NERMEEN SHAIKH: And despite what people may think of that, which is that it’s very scary or claustrophobic, it actually helped you. It’s really—I just—I feel lucky that I am here. AMY GOODMAN: I mean, isn’t this an absolutely critical talk—I mean, discussion? There’s no—you know, there’s like—this program could be an amazing program if it was like a halfway house and if they were paid the right amount, if they were paid like, you know, what CAL FIRE makes, or at least seasonal employees. In film, television, advertising and corporate uses then when you ultimately to... “ the Incarcerated women who Fight California ’ s also—I mean, I had felt were... Is controversial and totally unknowable, in the Big Bang world ’ s something that many effects... An elder person, he sort of know him more like—I think I just have never had... If they don ’ t prescribe it as much, because it controversial. 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